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that the assad regime will fall by next summer. the u.s. institute posted the activists who are part of a group called the day after project. they presented a transition plan for syria which they say it started being used by the opposition areas no longer under assad's control. this is just under two hours. >> good morning ladies and gentlemen. i am jim marshall the new president of the institute of peace which i'm delighted to tell you and i'm also very pleased that everyone is here today for a very important, to hear about a very important projects sponsored by the institute of peace. my job principally is to introduce steve heideman. steve stevens or senior advisor for middle east initiatives. he has taught at columbia. he is extensively published, has also directed the center for democracy and civil studies and civil society at georgetown university. he is a terrific asset to the institute. this project is one that is driven by syria with assistance, technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and sister institution in germany. it is very important that these kinds
council, we know that russia has been supplying hardware for assad. we understand -- we think that the americans are supporting ticket. this is a security council who is doing nothing in this situation. why should anyone believe that the u.n. can fix things? >> you are right that the divisions in the council make a solution difficult. that was one of the reasons i resigned, as you know, but the challenge is to overcome those divisions and get them working -- i tried. at the beginning, they came together, but it was not sustained. if the security council is not made to come together, then we are in a really hopeless situation. >> and syria will descend further into war? >> it could get worse. it could get much worse. how do we solve the problem? militarization or intervention, in my judgment, will make the situation much worse. >> what do you foresee happening? >> i think the neighbors will be drawn in. already, we have seen thousands of refugees fleeing to jordan, lebanon, turkey, iraq. she hottest elements are coming in across the border -- jihadist elements are coming in acr
world news america." tension in the middle east and a message to president assad to as turkey authorizes military action inside syria. >> this is not a mandate to wage war. it is so we can't prepare new development and protect our interests there. we are not declaring war on syria. >> mitt romney relaunched -- why the republicans are claiming victory at last night's u.s. presidential debate. >> coat ♪ >> love them, we do. 50 years ago today, the beatles released their first ever single. we look at how it holds up. decker packwood cause >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america to the problem. the turkish prime minister said today he had no intention of starting a war with syria. but the message is mixed and the tensions are high. the turkish parliament authorize military action against neighbor after syrian shells landed in the turkish town killing five civilians. >> lot this was not turkey's war, but the deaths of one family next to the syrian border have changed kuwait this country sees its neighbors conflicts. the government has called the strike from syria a final straw. left of
artillery fighting between turkey and syria. yesterday syrian activists predict that the assad regime will fall. this was held by the u.s. institute of peace, and it is close to two hours. >> good morning. in jim marshall, the new president of the institute of peace, which i am delighted to tell you, and i am pleased everyone is here for an import -- to hear about and the port project that has been sponsored by the institute for peace. my job is to introduce steve heideman. he has directed the center for democracy and civil studies -- civil society at georgetown. he -- he is a terrific asset for the institute. this project is driven by syrians, with technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and a sister institute in germany. it is important these efforts are driven by local populations, things that are handed down from the united states did not work all that well. we are pleased that you are here. i hope you have lots of questions, and if i can turn this over to you -- >> thank you para much, and let me add my welcome to you. we are delighted to see you her
is deeply hostile to president assad and says that syria must be held to account. they are urging nato allies to help. >> the a very very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease- fire. >> this is exactly what many people feared, the conflict spreading and flaming an already divided region. turkey backed the rebels, lightly armed, but without clear that ship. they have taken ground from a substantial army backed by iran in particular. president assad no longer controls his country, but equally he has not lost it. the longer the syrian deadlock, the greater the risk to its neighbors and the region will get sucked into confrontation. >> you will see this proxy conflict boiling over. you need some kind of international momentum to form a consensus that action can shift the ground away from conflict. >> note and to the conflict is in sight. syrian state television is that this does result of unbearable bombings and a lot of today. -- no end to the conflict is in sight. syrian state television said that this is the resul
at the moment in the middle east. there is a belief that a lot of the assad military are using weapons they've got from iran. is that true? and how long will you continue to support assad given the appalling conditions, the humanitarian catastrophe that we are all watching? at what point do you, the president of iran, say enough of this violence? >> translator: i do believe that we must all say enough of this violence right now. six months ago, i said enough of this violence. our opinion, vis-a-vis the issue of syria and other nations, is completely clear. we do believe that freedom, the right to choose, the right to vote, respect and justice is the fundamental right of all people. all people must obtain these rights. no one has the right to restrict a people and nation, but we believe as a friend of nations, we must help the nations around the world to obtain these rights through peaceful paths, through peaceful actions, and we have worked hard. i am now hard at work to organize a contact group in order to bring the two sides into a point of national agreement. >> mr. president, do you con
as a popular uprising against the assad dictatorship which has ruled syria 42 years. one of the most experienced war correspondents covering the civil war in syria is our clarissa ward. she's recently returned from aleppo and joins us now at the broadcast center in new york. clarissa, what can you tell us about who might have been behind these bombings today? >> reporter: well, scott, so far no group has actually claimed responsibility for today's attacks, but there is no doubt that there is an increasing number of extremist groups operating on the ground in syria. they're using the same kind of terrorist tactics that we've seen in iraq and afghanistan and part of the reason for that is this influx of foreign fighters that we've seen into the country. our crew actually spent time in a safe house on the border of turkey that was filled with fighters who had come from northern africa, from other countries, and they said they had come to syria to fight jihad. >> pelley: this civil war which began about 18 months ago to overthrow the dictatorship was in those days all about democracy and
. in the syrian capital damascus, aresident bashar al-assad made a cere public appearance, laying a wreath to the mark of anniversary of the 1973 war against israel. sresident assad's regime is fighting for the survival, and it's unlikely that he wants to antagonize a powerful neighbor like turkey. but the bloody chaos that's cost housanf thousands of lives inside syria, now threatens to entangle other countries, even if they don't really want to fight. holly williams, cbs news, istanbul, turkey. gh axelrod: now to afghanistan where two u.s. soldiers were .illed today by insurgents. it happened in the eastern section of the country that's seen heavy fighting in recent months. tomorrow marks the 11th anniversary of the start of the fghan war. coming up, a vatican insider nvicteted. stay with us. >> axelrod: at the vatican the verdict is in-- the pope's butler did it, found guilty of stealing papers from his boss and leaking them to the press. alan pizzey has been following intrigueigue. o reporter: paolo gabriele's record of seven years of alithful service as the papal ogyler and his apolog
's a very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease-fire. >> reporter: parts of the syrian city of lipo laid in rubles. syrian state tv said three suicide bombers detonated cars packed with explosives killing 34 people. three blasts went off within minutes of each other near military officer's club pap fourth struck near the chamber of commerce. the city has become one of the biggest battlegrounds in the 18 month fight between rebels and government forces. syria's parliament condemned the bombings referring to the rebels as terrorists trying to out of president bashir al assad. lipo has seen intense fighting but been rarely the target of suicide attacks. the kploegs triggered panic among some residents who just want the conflict to end. >> it's been three weeks since the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya was attacked. four americans were killed. there are questions and criticism of the u.s. response to the attack. congress is opening its own investigation. at the state department margaret brennan reports secretary clint
's a very, very dangerous situation. all responsible nations need to band together to persuade the assad regime to have a cease- fire. >> reporter: parts of the syrian city lay in rubble following four explosions. syrian state tv says three sue a side bombers -- suicide bombers detonated cars. packed with explosives. they went off within minutes of each other near a military officers club. the city has become one of the biggest battlegrounds in the 18- month fight between rebels and government forces. serious parliament -- syria's parliament condemned the bombs as terrorists trying to oust president assad. the explosions triggered panic among some residents who just want the conflict to end. vinita nair for cbs news. >> president assad reportedly visited ahelp poe on tuesday to get a firsthand look at the fighting. he has ordered 30,000 more troops into that battle. >>> here's a look at some other things making news now at 4:37. teachers in chicago have approved a new three-year contract. it includes pay increases and a new evaluation system. the chicago board of education is expected to
to operate against syria. the turkish government has taken a very strong position against assad and calling for him to leave and accusing him of terrible deeds. so, yes, but it's not in the interest of the syrians to provoke the turks. the turkish army is fairly strong and the syrians are already having trouble fighting the free syrian army why bring in another enemy? >> pelley: hisham melhem, you see it that way to? >> the syrians said they are investigating the accident but obviously we don't know if t exact circumstances. logically one would say assad can't provoke the turks because the turkish army is strong and they can take out the syrian army which is already exhausted. at the same time there are those who would argue that it's in the interest of syria to force the turks to play their hand and even the threat of a regional conflagration could force the international powers, the russians, the iranians, others to push the turks not to help the syrian opposition as we talk now we can talk about a regional conflict albeit on a limited basis. we know iranians are sending technicians, trai
ambassador. it's working with the arab league to identify people to help force assad out of power a year after president obama said, we want assad out of power. he has substantive things to talk about on the debate stage when they debate foreign policy in two weeks and that ad is now irrelevant. >> don't you think this is a case of him saying, i'll do the things the president is trying to do but do them more effectively? >> there's a fair case to make and there's an opening for that. >> i agree. i'm not saying that's a bad thing. >> there's an opening the size of a pin drop. he didn't lay out his strategy for peace in israel. on iran, the best he could come up with was, i'm going to get tougher on iran because i'm going to have tougher sanctions. >> when barack obama came to office, he said, i'm not george w. bush, so therefore, i can negotiate with iran. >> he said he would open up all doors but he wasn't going to give you a seat at the table unless you wanted to come and talk peace. >> we have unsolicited advice on the other side of the break including helpful hints for donald trump. s
going from both sides. as president bashar al-assad syrian troops launched another attack on the rebels in the northern part of his country. there is a heavy turkish military presence this. clearly, the artillery has been given the grown light to fired. it is a dangerous dynamic and we could have a regional war. turkey is part of nato, so turkey could invoke the collective defense clause of that treaty and it would draw on the united states and other western allies to recollect and defend turkey if it gets into a war with syria. the other dynamic, the syrian rebels need help. it could be a point that syrian rebels launch shells at turkey to try and start a war that obviously they would get a lost help from going up against the common enemy, president bashar al-assad. >>trace: and the syrian rebel, how are they doing? >>guest: they have not been doing great but this week they did get some good news in an unusual victory. they took over a syrian air defense space which means they got the missiles inside that base, and if they can figure out how to use the missiles against president bashar
with the overall win forethier for this season. >> he was part of syrian president assad's brutal regime and now he's talking to cnn. >> how did assad's behavior change? >> translator: he seemed worried all day long. we rarely saw him smiling. he stared out the windows and was always anxious and tense. >> the tearian press officer give as firsthand account of what is happening inside the government. "homemade" yummy, scrumptious bars. hmm? i just wanted you to eat more fiber. chewy, oatie, gooeyness... and fraudulence. i'm in deep, babe. you certainly are. [ male announcer ] fiber one. i'm in deep, babe. you certainly are. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. if we want to improve our schools... ...what should we invest in? maybe new buildings? what about updated equipment? they can help, but recent research shows... ...nothing transforms schools like investing in advanced teacher education. let's build a strong foundation. let's invest in our teachers so they can inspire our students. let's solve this. side by s
with other nations to arm rebels in syria with weapons that can defeat president bashir al assad's army. at a rally in florida, romney promised to be a strong international leader if elected. >> when i'm president i'll take the care it takes to rebuild our principles and restore the principles that made america strong. >> reporter: the republican nominee couldn't resist taking another shot at the president's debate performance. >> now of course days later we're hearing his excuses and next january we'll watch him leave the white house for the last time. >> reporter: romney and the president have two more debates cancelleded. later this week is the vice presidential debate. now the obama camp is dismissing the romney speech saying it's a third or fourth time to explain his global intentions. on a fundraising note the president raised $181 million last month. >> there are two presidential debates left in campaign 2012. but on thursday the vice presidential candidates go head-to-head. usually there's little attention paid to the debate between vp candidates who rarely play a role who wins
. a burial takes place and nato condemns the assad regime. welcome to gmt. david eades. coming up, with an audience of 50 million to impress, as romney gained ground on obama in the first of the televised presidential debates? >> it is not moral for my generation to keep spending more than we take in, knowing those burdens of will be passed on to the next generation. >> i promised i would fight every single day on behalf of the american people, the middle class, and all those striving to get into the middle class. kept that promise. >> also -- ♪ ♪ you know i love you >> 50 years since the beatles released their first single. it's midday in london, 7:00 in the morning in washington, 2:00 in the afternoon in turkey where the parliament is in an emergency session over a bill of the rise across borders military operations in syria. turkey has already retaliated to the mortar attack that killed five people in a border town. despite international calls for restraint, that military response is still going on. reports that syrian soldiers may have been killed. now this report. >> the
children, all of them were killed when a rocket landed on his house. >> to live is to die. bashar al-assad is a daunting task. you will die wherever you go. they say foreign aid is being provided, but we see nothing. just let us die and get it over with. >> aleppo has become the defining battle in this civil war. neither side can afford to lose, but in truth, neither is winning. what does seem to be happening is the slow, painful death of syria. >> aiding the rebels in syria was one of many issues which mitt romney touchdown during a foreign policy speech in virginia today. charging the obama administration is sitting on the sidelines, he did not offer specifics, but laid out this policy. >> in syria, i will work with our partners to organize those members of the opposition who share our values. they obtained the arms they need to defeat the tanks and helicopters and fighter jets. >> mitt romney in virginia today. for more on what he had to say and how foreign policy is playing his campaign, i am joined by our foreign policy correspondent. thank you for coming in. how would president romne
and then ensure that they obtain the arms they need to beat assads tanks and helicopters. >> five people who share our values, what does that mean? and then work to obtain that they have arms? what does that mean? >> well, to be honest, there's no real difference between that and the president's position as well. the question is, how over are you going to do this? and i gave a, you can defeat assad tank and helicopters by supplying arms to this group of rebels. that's not realistic. if you're going to talk about leadership and america's leadership in the world, you have to admit that syria's defenses are far superior to any of the countries that we've seen toppled so easily, such as libya, for instance. so you can't just assert leadership by saying, i'm going to be your leader. you have to say what you're going to do and how it's going to be different from the leader that you are criticizing. that's what we didn't see from syria or today in what he said about iran either because he talks tough on iran, not clear how anything, anything he's proposed would be anything different. >> and he does this,
the rebels, no-fly zone like in libya. and get involved on the side of the anti-assad forces. >> yes. everything that we said would happen, if we got involved, is happening because we're not involved. al-qaeda is pouring in to the place. the massacres have increased. iranians and russians have increased their supplies and support of al assad and the tensions in the region are going up. look at syria, turkey, jordan, syria -- >> bill: sure. it's cauldron over there. >> absolutely. >> bill: i wanted to get your opinion on what you would have done had you been president. finally, were you surprised that president obama was so flat in the debate? he wasn't the guy that debated you four years ago. >> well, i think that there is a fundamental change here, bill, and that was in 2008, he didn't have a record to defend. and he's been living in a four-year bubble surrounded by an adoring media. this is the first time that he has really had to respond and he couldn't because he's having to defend a record which is indefensible. and i guess the second thing is that what is probably most impactfu
president bashar al assad to step down due to his crackdown on his own citizens. and there have been a number of incidents between the two countries. last june, syrian antiaircraft defenses shot down a turkish military reconnaissance jet, killing two pilots, both sides disagree on where exactly that incident took place. but the turks did not really fire back. they didn't use force aside from condemning that attack. the syrians accused turkey of arming the rebels that are fighting against bashar al assad's regime. so this is a very tense relationship and there are voices here at turkey calling for more significant retaliation in response to the death of these five turkish citizens. >> how do the turks feel, ivan, when it comes to possible military intervention in syria? >> i think there are a lot of misgivings, brooke. there are a lot of voices here that are afraid that turkey could be dragged into a war with syria. opposition, political parties have spoken out against the government's policy of supporting the syrian opposition and supporting the syrian rebels. they actually accused t
normally, but they don't necessarily support assad. >> do they believe this is going to end, and it's going to end well, or do they believe that this killing will just continue for a long period of time? >> i think people right now believe that it's going to go on, that it's going to continue, that there's no immediate end in sight. they just kind of get on -- they're sort of in the middle class who are less well off and less affected by the battles themselves. they're just trying to get on with their lives, but i think they all know that this ultimately is going to come to just a worsening situation where there's more loss of life. i think what we've seen, for example, in alleppo today with those car bombs that makes it look like the battle is turning into as we saw in iraq, and certainly some of the groups that are getting involved in the fight with -- on the rebel side using tactics that have been borrowed from al qaeda and others. that's why we're beginning to see some of those tactics. >> there are 30,000 people, perhaps more who have been killed over the course of this uprising. talk
because, as you know, the rebels are demanding assad has to leave. >> yeah. >> rose: and they're not willing apparently, to have much political conversations until that happens. >> yeah, but my point is that for the first time an international gathering agreed on a process, an international meeting including russia agreed on a process leading to a transition in syria. my point is that could serve as the basis for an international response through the u.n. security council. you asked me what could i recommend. >> rose: right, right. >> that's what i could recommend. and, of course, if the parties involved did not comply with that binding resolution, it should have some consequences. it's not for me to elaborate on which consequences. but i do believe that the whole international community has a responsibility to prevent what i see as a humanitarian disaster in syria. and it is clearly a violation of international law. but i think seen from a strategic point of view both russia and china should have a self-interest in being so to speak on the right side of history. and i think t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 119 (some duplicates have been removed)